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Jan 13, 2017 7:39 am
Peter S30 Offline
Global Moderator
Registered since: Nov 27, 2007
Location: Germany


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
I think Lagonda had a reason to make this unusual clutch design and I think the reason is they wanted to reduce the mass of parts that have to change speed when you change gears in order to speed gear change up. If these parts are light also the clutch brake is more effective. Of course one could redesign it all with a stronger driven plate and a stronger clutch brake, but the more inertia there is, the more unforgiving it will be with the slightest mismatch in speeds when changing gears. If one wants it "improved" he can have the modern type clutch replacement from the club. I prefer the original, you simply must not slip the clutch. If all works well, and if the driver is not tired, gear change can be a dream with this clutch and gearbox (I admit often I am tired..)
 

Jan 13, 2017 9:39 am
Colin M34 Offline
Member
Registered since: Dec 01, 2007
Location: Suffolk, UK


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
I think Peter has a point.

I have the original configuration on my 2 Litre, but with a modern lining. If I am tired and maneuvering the car up a slope so my clutch gets hot, I now get a vile smell of rotten fish which I think is the lining getting very hot. However when it has cooled down it is fine and much better than with the old lining which simply would not grip at all when hot.

Can I applaud Peter's view about not fitting the modern type clutch replacement? This goes along with putting in an Alvis synchromesh box!

There is a lot of fun to be had adjusting the clutch stop. Late and hard is what is required.

Colin
 

Jan 13, 2017 11:04 am
Peter S30 Offline
Global Moderator
Registered since: Nov 27, 2007
Location: Germany


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
yes, and tired or not, hill or not, the clutch must not slip and does not if plate and linings and springs are correct. The only situation where the driven plate is in danger may be starting from rest on a hill.
 

Oct 15, 2018 3:22 pm
rdesalis Offline
Member
Registered since: May 16, 2017
Location: -


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
Hi all,
Our 2 litre (1931 SC) has a clutch that engages fine, no slip at all. It disengages fully at idle speed. But at higher revs, like 1500 RPM, it develops drag - enough to prevent you pulling it out of gear. Is this a well known fault? Any ideas? Also the clutch adjustment procedure hasnt been done for some years. Does anyone have it in electronic form that they could send me rdesalis@umich.edu ? Thanks!
 

Oct 15, 2018 6:33 pm
Colin M34 Offline
Member
Registered since: Dec 01, 2007
Location: Suffolk, UK


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
Hiya

As I said earlier, try adjusting the clutch stop to bring the gearbox shafts to a complete dead stop (hard) when the pedal is fully depressed (late). The clutch stop is there to do this.

Another thought. If you have ever driven a Bugatti, they have a semi-centrifugal clutch for a fast take-off. If you press the pedal down at tickover it does not need much force to disengage, but as you rev the engine up it needs much more pressure on the pedal. I found this with my friend's Brescia Bugatti going up the test-hill at Brooklands. It was quite useful for a racing start.

I believe your 2LSC is a very famous car with a racing history from new. Perhaps the clutch was modified to have the same effect.

Colin
 

Oct 16, 2018 2:59 pm
rdesalis Offline
Member
Registered since: May 16, 2017
Location: -


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
Thanks Colin - interesting thought. I think there is something wrong though. It has only developed this trait in the last few years. The clutch stop unfortunately cannot stop it, as the drag is so high, however it is adjusted. I wonder if part of the lining could be coming away.
 

Oct 16, 2018 6:58 pm
Mark Offline
Member
Registered since: Feb 05, 2009
Location: Worcestershire


Subject: Re: 2ltr clutch
The slotted drive plate may have slightly distorted through riding the clutch.
When the engine warms at higher revs above idle speed the distortion may just increase sufficiently to foul the linings...or could your clutch stop be out of adjustment and causing the problem? To rule this out adjust it right back so it has no effect and see if the change problem is still there when driving without it.
Hope this helps
Mark
 

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